The LaFontaines - Common Problem (Wolf At Your Door)

The LaFontaines deliver power electric social commentary with Common Problem

The LaFontaines – Common Problem (Wolf At Your Door)

Genre – Indie rock

2015 saw The LaFontaines explode onto the indie rock scene with their debut album, and the Motherwell kids are back. Two years on and everything is bigger. The five piece have bigger sounds, bigger songs and a bigger message, and it’s as typically Scottish as album number one.

Much like Biffy Clyro and Twin Atlantic, Kerr Okan brings his thick Scottish brogue to the heart of his music, and with The LaFontaines rap twist, it’s incredibly infectious.

With an intense, relatable social commentary taking shape from opening key of Explosion, the band set their sights on dissecting the wrongs of society and screaming about their pain.

Common Problem has a deep rooted political theme running through its core, and is unusually matched by what appears to be teenage angst. But, The LaFontaines are not teenagers anymore. They’ve grown up, and they’ve provided a voice of truth for their audience. This is not teenage ‘I hate my life’ angst, its real grown up issues like the living wage or Scotland being freezing, or as some may call it – reality.

Sonically, The LaFontaines remain loyal to their roots with electronic noise aplenty, but Common Problem has much more variety than their debut release, and is packed with explosive riffs throughout.

With such a variety of sounds on offer, this album is difficult to categorise. It’s honed, it’s fun, it’s dark, it’s happy, it’s sad and most of all it leaves a lasting mark. The LaFontaines have their production down to a T, and the sound of this thumping release is as sharp as its dense lyrical content.

Common Problem is a unique indie rock album. At times it’s full of big riffs and lends itself solely to the rock end of the genre, but then you are hit by Asleep, a track that would comfortably feel at home spinning in a house club. On the other end of the spectrum, Total Control draws influence from Enter Shakari, with scratching electric vibes screaming out of the heavy rock sound to create a style that will resonate with nu-metal fans.

This album definitely won’t be for everyone, but everyone should give it at least one listen.

RUSHONROCK RATED – 8/10 If you tell me time is money, then that’s all that I’ve spent.

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Northumbria University Journalism graduate, rock and roll enthusiast and co-editor of RUSHONROCK.com.

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